Calendar

Jan
16
Wed
Pesticide Training in Western Nebraska
Jan 16 – Apr 11 all-day

Nebraska Extension will be offering training throughout western Nebraska, from January through April, for licensed pesticide applicators seeking first-time certification or recertification of their license for 2019.

      A license is required to use or purchase or apply restricted-use pesticides. Extension provides training for several classes of certification, including commercial, non-commercial (such as local government or research purposes) and private applicators (such as ag producers).

Private applicators

      Private pesticide applicators with licenses expiring in 2019, and anyone seeking first-time private applicator certification, can attend these upcoming training sessions.

      Licensed private pesticide applicators can buy and use restricted-use pesticides in their own farming operations after completing this training.

      Main topics include Nebraska’s pesticide laws and regulations, the pesticide label, personal safety, the worker protection standard, environmental protection, integrated pest management, pesticides and application, application equipment, equipment calibration, pesticide drift awareness near sensitive sites like apiaries and vineyards, how to use the Driftwatch website, and control options for prairie dogs and pocket gophers, and strategies to reduce chances of developing weed populations resistant to herbicides.

      To reserve space for each session, or for more information, call the number for the local Extension office listed after each date. The cost of training is $40. Applicators whose permits are due for renewal should have received a letter from the State Department of Agriculture. They can bring that letter to the training session and avoid having to fill out an application form.

      Private pesticide licenses also can be obtained by completing an online course. Pesticide applicators can purchase access to the online course via http://marketplace.unl.edu and going to the Pesticide Education section. Cost of the course is $60. Those who complete pesticide applicator training then need to apply to the Nebraska Department of Agriculture for a three-year license card for a $25 fee.

      Valentine, Jan. 16: 1:30 p.m. CST, 4-H Building at the Fairgrounds (call 402-336-2760)

      Cody, Jan. 17: 10 a.m., Adamson Community Center (call 402-336-2760)

      Sidney, Jan. 17: 9:30 a.m., Cheyenne Community Center (call 308-254-4455)

      Kimball, Jan. 29: 1 p.m., 4-H Building (call 308-235-3122)

      Hyannis, Jan. 29: 1 p.m., Grant County Courthouse (call 308-645-2267)

      Alliance, Jan. 30: 8:30 a.m., Box Butte County Extension Office (call 308-762-5616)

      Alliance, Jan. 30, 1 p.m., Box Butte County Extension Office (call 308-762-5616)

      Scottsbluff, Jan. 30: 1 p.m., Panhandle Research & Extension (call 308-632-1480)

      Mullen, Feb. 4: 1 p.m.., Hooker County Library (call 308-645-2267)

      Chappell, Feb. 5: 1 p.m., Lion’s Den (call 308-874-2705)

      Chadron, Feb. 6: 1 p.m., Dawes County 4-H Building, Fairgrounds (call 308-432-3373)

      Mirage Flats, 13: 1 p.m., St. Peter’s Lutheran Church (call 308-327-2312)

      Bridgeport, Feb. 14: 1 p.m., Prairie Winds Community Center (call 308-262-1022)

      Thedford, Feb. 14:: 1 p.m., Thomas County Courthouse (call 308-645-2267)

      Crawford, Feb. 20: 1 p.m., Community Center (call 308-432-3373)

      Rushville, March 6: 1 p.m., American Legion (call 308-327-2312)

      Oshkosh, March 7: 1 p.m., Wesleyan Church (call 308-772-3311)

      Alliance, March 13: 1 p.m., Box Butte County Extension Office (call 308-762-5616)

      Harrison, March 21: 1 p.m., Sioux County Courthouse (call 308-668-2428)

      Valentine, April 3: 10 a.m. CST, Cherry County Courthouse (call 402-336-2760)

      Scottsbluff, April 4: 1 p.m., Panhandle Research & Extension Center (call 308-632-1480)

Commercial, non-commercial applicators

      Commercial applicators are those using restricted-use pesticides, and in some cases general-use pesticides, on a contract or for-hire basis. Noncommercial applicators are those applying these same pesticides to sites owned by an employer or for a governmental agency or political subdivision of the state.

      Commercial/noncommercial pesticide applicators with certifications expiring in April have been sent 2019 Pesticide Safety Education Program Schedule booklets that has certification information and dates. Copies of the schedule booklet are available at local extension office or by phoning UNL’s pesticide education office at 800-627-7216 or 402-472-1632 or online at

https://pested.unl.edu/documents/2019-PSEP-Training-Booklet.pdf

      Advance registration is required for all initial and recertification of commercial/noncommercial applicator training and most other training sessions. An $80 fee applies for each applicator registering, regardless of the number of categories registered for. Required study materials for initial training range from $10 to $30 per manual, depending on category. Registration can be done on-line at https://pested.unl.edu

      UNL conducts the training programs, and the Nebraska Department of Agriculture grants the licenses.  NDA testing is offered at initial training locations. Questions about individual applicator license status should be directed to NDA at 402-471-2351 or 877-800-4080.

      Extension’s Pesticide Safety Education Program has scheduled training for commercial and non-commercial applicators whose licenses expire this year, or who need to take initial training.

       Recertification in several applicator categories is offered at the following locations and dates. Check with the Pesticide Safety Education Program for details, such as which categories are available at each site. Preregistration is required at pested.unl.edu.

      Commercial and non-commercial license training sessions will be conducted at these dates and locations. Recertification sessions begin at 9 a.m. and initial training sessions at 8:30 a.m.

      Feb. 7, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (recertification)

      Feb. 12, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (initial)

      Feb. 21, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (recertification)

      Feb. 26, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (initial)

      Feb. 28, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (initial)

      March 1, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (initial)

      March 26, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (recertification)

      April 11, Scottsbluff: Panhandle Research and Extension Center (initial)

Mar
21
Thu
NCBA Synchronization webinar
Mar 21 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

NCBA Cattlemen Webinar Series: Planning for Synchronization Success webinar
March 21, 2019 – 7:00 p.m. CST

Many cattle synchronization protocols have data that demonstrates them working very effectively.  Details such as the goals of your operation, facilities, and labor are important in choosing the protocol that will be the most successful in your operation.  In this presentation they will discuss how to choose the protocol that will fit your operation the best and help you understand what it will take to successfully implement that protocol.  Register and get more information here…. http://www.beefusa.org/cattlemenswebinarseries.aspx

Speakers
Dr. Sandy Johnson is a Professor and Extension Beef Specialist for K-State Research and Extension located at the Northwest Research and Extension Center in Colby. Dr. Johnson conducts research and extension programs in the areas of estrous synchronization, breeding systems and cow/calf management.  Dr Johnson was raised on a diversified livestock farm in northeast Nebraska and received a B.S. degree in Animal Science from the University of Nebraska.   She went on to receive a M.S. degree from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. degree from West Virginia University, both in Reproductive Physiology.

Dr. David Patterson is a member of the faculty in the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri.  Patterson, a native of Montana, completed his B.S. and M.S. degrees at Montana State University. Patterson received his Ph.D. in reproductive physiology from Kansas State University. Patterson served on the faculty at the University of Kentucky for eight years prior to joining the Division of Animal Sciences at MU in 1996. Dr. Patterson’s research efforts have gained wide industry acceptance and resulted in new strategies to synchronize estrous cycles of postpartum beef cows and replacement beef heifers.

Mar
22
Fri
Aquaculture Conference
Mar 22 @ 8:30 am – Mar 23 @ 1:00 pm

The Coalition to Support Iowa’s Farmers (CSIF) is hosting the 2019 Aquaculture Conference on March 22 and 23 to provide farmers information about Iowa’s newest emerging livestock industry. The event, co-sponsored by Iowa State University and the North Central Regional Aquaculture Center (NCRAC), will be held at the Quality Inn & Suites in Ames from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday.

The event will include a wide range of important topics for farmers to consider such as the opportunities and economics of aquaculture, rules and regulations for fish farms, permits needed to buy and sell fish and shrimp, marketing, production systems, water chemistry, fish health and shrimp culture.

Registration, including a complimentary lunch, is free if completed by March 15. A $20 fee will be charged for registrations after March 15. For more information and to register, visit https://bit.ly/2T90PtZ or call 800-932-2436. Space is limited.

The NCRAC is one of the five Regional Aquaculture Centers established by Congress that are administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. NCRAC is an administrative unit that serves the 12 states in the North Central Region: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Options for Empty Dairy Facilities webinar
Mar 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The I-29 Moo University collaborative will host a webinar titled “Renovating Dairy Barns: Giving Them a Second Career” for dairy owners considering alternatives for their dairy facilities after selling their cows. The webinar will be held at noon on Friday, March 22.

Presenters will address three topics of concern for producers making the enterprise transition:
– Brian Dougherty, agricultural engineering specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, will cover important engineering considerations when planning for the conversion of dairy barns to facilities for other livestock. Advantages and limitations of different designs will be discussed, and examples of dairy barn conversions will be shown.
– Bill Halfman, associate professor and agricultural agent with the University of Wisconsin, will discuss the economics of beef feeding enterprises, how to determine if they are a good fit for an operation and available resources, plus showcase spreadsheet tools and benchmark numbers producers should consider.
– Tina Kohlman, dairy and livestock agent with the University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present on the economics for farms that are no longer milking but are considering raising pre-weaned calves to utilize their facilities and labor for income generation.

After the presentations, audience members will have an opportunity to ask questions. In addition, the program will be archived for viewing at a later time.

There is no registration fee for the webinar, but pre-registration can be completed online and is required. Following registration, a link will be emailed with directions on how to access the webinar. Topical webinars featuring extension professionals are part of the on-going educational programs available through I-29 Moo University.

The I-29 Moo University is a consortium of extension dairy specialists from Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. For more information on this and other I-29 Moo University programs contact Fred M. Hall at 712-737-4230 or fredhall@iastate.edu.

Mar
23
Sat
Burt Co Cattlemen Ladies Night
Mar 23 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm

The Annual Burt County Cattlemen Ladies Night is set for Saturday March 23, 6:30pm at the Lyons City Auditorium.

Mar
25
Mon
Agrability Training Wksp
Mar 25 – Mar 28 all-day

Agricultural workers with disabilities or chronic illness, their families and professional staff are invited to the AgrAbility National Training Workshop from March 25-28 at the Embassy Suites in downtown Lincoln.

The workshop, hosted by Nebraska AgrAbility, is the foremost educational event in the nation addressing disabilities in agriculture. Potential clients and their families, AgrAbility staff members and stakeholders — including U.S. Department of Agriculture and rehabilitation professionals, other nonprofit members, and suppliers of products beneficial to AgrAbility customers — are invited.

The program will offer information on leveraging resources and direct service to clients; networking opportunities with other clients, service providers and agency representatives; and training.

Registration is required at http://www.agrability.org/agrability-national-training-workshop. Early-bird registration ends March 1, and registration closes March 21.

Commodity Futures Basics
Mar 25 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Alan Feller of Feller Commodities is hosting an “Intro to Commodity Futures Trading Basics” class on Monday nights in February and March, from 7pm to 9pm each Monday night. Topics to be covered include using corn and soybeans futures and options, what are calls and puts and how do they work, and taking this information and incorporating it into your overall grain marketing strategy. The class takes place at the Feller Commodity office at 715 E. Hwy 275 in Wisner. There is no charge to attend. This is not a series…. the same class will be offered each Monday night, but it can be partly tailored for those in attendance. You can attend one night or multiple nights. Please call the office to reserve a spot at 402-529-6555.

Mar
26
Tue
Central Plains Dairy Expo
Mar 26 – Mar 28 all-day

Central Plains Dairy Expo
The Sanford Premier Center Complex, Sioux Falls, S.D.
March 26-28, 2019
www.centralplainsdairy.com

Tuesday, March 26, 2019
5:30pm – Welcome Reception
7:30pm – Travis Tritt in Concert
9:30pm – Hospitality Rooms

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

7:00am – Ag Prayer Breakfast
8:30am – Trade Show

9:00am – Breakout Session — Group #1
Breakout Session #1 – Road To Robotics — Stories And Tips From Dairies That Have Made The Journey To Labor Saving Automation 
Breakout Session #2 – The Levers To Pull And Buttons To Push: Navigating Through A Financial Downturn In Dairy Farming 
Breakout Session #3 – Building Resiliency Against Productivity Robbing Microorganisms 
Breakout Session #4 – Dairycare 365 – Implementation On Your Dairy

10:30am – Breakout Session — Group #2
Workshop in Spanish #1
Breakout Session #5 – FARM 4.0: Get Ready For Calf Welfare Audits 
Breakout Session #6 – Food Safety: Am I responsible?
Breakout Session #7 – Introducing Strateris™ ECL from United Animal Health
Breakout Session #8 – Sub-acute Ruminal Acidosis: Impact On Rumen Health
Breakout Session #9 – Better Times Ahead?
Employee Workshop #1 – Food Safety: Am I responsible?

1:00pm – Breakout Session — Group #3
Breakout Session #10 – Dry Cow Therapy: Setting Her Up For Success
Breakout Session #11 – Making The Best Decisions In Your Forage Investment: Understanding Some Differences In Alfalfa Genetics And That They Are Not All Created Equal.
Breakout Session #12 – Dairy Heifer Inventory Management — The Struggle Is Real. Make Every Animal Count.
Breakout Session #13 – The Total Dairy Makeover From An HR Perspective

2:30pm – Breakout Session — Group #4
Workshop in Spanish #2
Breakout Session #14 – Management Practices To Reduce Mycotoxins In The Field
Breakout Session #15 – Clean Feed: Optimizing Health And Nutrition
Breakout Session #16 – Merging Veterinary and Nutritional Science To Defeat Feed Hygiene Issues
Breakout Session #17 – Importance Of Energy And Osmolality For Reducing Scours And Sick Calves
Employee Workshop #2 – Feeding Management Strategies For Improving Income Over Feed Cost

4:00pm – Breakout Session — Group #5
Workshop in Spanish #3
Breakout Session #18 – Balancing Sugars, Starch and Fiber For A Profitable Rumen And Higher Milk Components
Breakout Session #19 – The Success Of A Dairy Calf Starts At Birth: Nutrition And Management Of The Dairy Heifer
Breakout Session #20 – Maximizing And Measuring Digestible Fiber In Dairy Diets
Breakout Session #21 – Managing The “New” Highly Digestible Alfalfa Technologies In The Field And Dairy Ration

5:00pm – Cheese Social, Trade Show floor, Convention Center and Arena

Thursday, March 28, 2019
8:00am – 9:30am – Free Pancake Breakfast
8:00am – 3:00pm – Trade Show

8:00am – Breakout Session — Group #6
Breakout Session #22 – Dry Cow Therapy: Setting Her Up For Success
Breakout Session #23 – Making The Best Decisions In Your Forage Investment: Understanding Some Differences In Alfalfa Genetics And That They Are Not All Created Equal.
Breakout Session #24 – Dairy Heifer Inventory Management — The Struggle Is Real. Make Every Animal Count
Breakout Session #25 – The Total Dairy Makeover From An HR Perspective

9:30am – Breakout Session — Group #7
Breakout Session #26 – Clean Feed: Optimizing Health And Nutrition
Breakout Session #27 – Management Practices To Reduce Mycotoxins In The Field
Breakout Session #28 – Merging Veterinary and Nutritional Science To Defeat Feed Hygiene Issues
Breakout Session #29 – Importance Of Energy And Osmolality For Reducing Scours And Sick Calves

10:30am – Workshop in Spanish #4
Breakout Session #30 – Food Safety: Am I responsible? (presented in Spanish)
10:30am – Employee Workshop #3 – Food Safety: Am I responsible?

11:00am – Breakout Session — Group #8
Breakout Session #31 – Balancing Sugars, Starch and Fiber For A Profitable Rumen And Higher Milk Components
Breakout Session #32 – The Success Of A Dairy Calf Starts At Birth: Nutrition And Management Of The Dairy Heifer
Breakout Session #33 – Maximizing And Measuring Digestible Fiber In Dairy Diets
Breakout Session #34 – Managing The “New” Highly Digestible Alfalfa Technologies In The Field And Dairy Ration

12:00pm – Workshop in Spanish #5
Employee Workshop #4 – Injectable Trace Minerals to Improve Health in our Calves / Minerales Traza Inyectables para Mejorar la Salud en Nuestras Becerras

12:30pm – Breakout Session — Group #9
Breakout Session #35 – The Road To Robotics — Stories and Tips From Dairies That Made The Journey To Labor Saving Automation
Breakout Session #36 – The Levers To Pull And Buttons To Push: Navigating Through A Financial Downturn In Dairy Farming
Breakout Session #37 – Building Resiliency Against Productivity Robbing Microorganisms
Breakout Session #38 – Dairycare 365 – Implementation On Your Dairy

1:30pm – 2:30pm Workshop in Spanish #6

2:00pm – Breakout Session — Group #10
Breakout Session #39  – FARM 4.0: Get Ready For Calf Welfare Audits
Breakout Session #40 – Introducing Strateris™ ECL from United Animal Health
Breakout Session #41 – Sub-acute Ruminal Acidosis: Impact On Rumen Health

2:00pm – Employee Workshop #5
Oxytocin And The 3 A’s: Aim, Applicability and Advices

3:00pm – Expo Closes – See you next year!

Dairy Beef Bull Calf shortcouse
Mar 26 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

The 2019 Dairy Beef Short Course, presented by the I-29 Moo University consortium, will focus on how dairy beef bull calves should be viewed as more than a by-product of the industry. The consortium is a collaboration of extension dairy specialists from Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

As dairy and beef producers continue to experience economic struggles, increasing the value of bull calves can add value for dairymen, feeders and processors. The short course is scheduled for Tuesday, March 26 in at the Denny Sanford Premier Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. It is held in conjunction with the Central Plains Dairy Expo.

While parking and entry to the Dairy Expo is free, there is a $20 registration fee to attend the Dairy Beef Short Course. The fee includes educational materials, refreshments and lunch. The registration deadline is March 20; registration should be made online… https://tinyurl.com/dairybeefshortcourse.

The course’s program agenda includes:
    Realizing Full Value in Holstein Steers – Daniel Schaefer, professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Considerations for Choosing Beef Genetics To Use in Dairy Herds – Warren Rusche, extension beef feedlot management associate at South Dakota State University.
    Dairy Cattle Impact on Beef Supply and Marketing Opportunities – Brenda Boetel, professor of agricultural economics at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.
    Enhancing the Value of Your Dairy Beef Bull Calf to Meet Health Concerns – Russ Daly, DVM, and professor and extension veterinarian at South Dakota State University.

Additionally, a roundtable discussion will focus on Building a Carcass for the Future. The panel includes:
    Jerry Wulf, Wulf Cattle, Morris, Minnesota.
    Kent Pruismann, Rock River Feeders, Sioux Center, Iowa.
    Erik Loe, nutritional consultant for Midwest PMS, Sioux Center, Iowa.
    Duane Broek, Select Sires representative, Watertown, South Dakota.

The program will begin promptly at 10 a.m. and will conclude at 3:15 p.m. For more information, contact Fred M. Hall, dairy specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, at 712-737-4230 or fredhall@iastate.edu.

Mar
29
Fri
UNL Agronomy & Horticulture seminars
Mar 29 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

UNL Agronomy and Horticulture seminars

Jan. 25 — Nevin Lawrence, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, integrated weed management specialist, “Integrated Weed Management in the Panhandle of Nebraska.”

Feb. 1 — Sabrina Ruis, postdoctoral research associate in agronomy and horticulture, “Cover Crops and Soil Ecosystem Services in the Great Plains.”

Feb. 8 — Justin McMechan, assistant professor, crop protection and cropping systems specialist, Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, “Cover Crop Management and Insect Interactions.”

Feb. 22 — Leah Sandall, distance education coordinator in agronomy and horticulture; McKinzie Sutter, distance education specialist in agronomy and horticulture; Grace Troupe, online instructor in agronomy and horticulture, “Online Teaching: You Can Do It Too!”

March 1 — Sally Clayshulte, Bayer Crop Science, adjunct associate professor of agronomy and horticulture.

March 8 — Marilyne Stains, associate professor of chemistry, “How is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics taught in North American Universities?”

March 15 — Marty Williams, ecologist in the USDA-ARS, adjunct professor, University of Illinois, “From Transcripts to the Tri-State: Exploiting Plant Density Tolerance to Improve an American Delicacy.”

March 29 — Daran Rudnick, assistant professor of biological systems engineering, irrigation management specialist, West Central Research and Extension Center, “Input Use Efficiency and Farm Profitability as Influenced by Management Practices.”

April 5 — Michael Grusak, center director of the USDA-ARS Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, “Impacting People’s Lives — Strategies to Provide Nutrient-Enriched Staple Food Crops.”

April 12 — Michelle Graham, research geneticist in the USDA-ARS, Iowa State University.

April 19 — Tonya Haigh, project manager rural sociologist of natural resources, National Drought Mitigation Center, “Decision-Making during Drought: What Spurs a Range Manager to Take Action?”

Each talk is in Keim Hall, Room 150, UNL East Campus in Lincoln, and can also be watched online. All seminars are free and open to the public and refreshments will be served at 3 p.m.

Mar
30
Sat
Beginning Field Scout school
Mar 30 @ 8:30 am – 3:30 pm

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is hosting a field crop scouting school on Saturday, March 30 at the Field Extension Education Laboratory in Boone. The day-long program is designed for beginning crop scouts to ensure they are ready for success when they get out in the field.

The course features sessions on corn and soybean growth and development, weed, disease and insect identification, along with scouting methods and techniques. Attendees will rotate through classes and have the opportunity for one-on-one interactions with ISU Extension and Outreach specialists and agronomists throughout the sessions. Five field guides are included in course registration:
–    Corn and Soybean Field Guide
–    Weed Identification Field Guide
–    Field Crop Insects
–    Corn Diseases
–    Soybean Diseases

With field guides in hand, course participants will have the opportunity to apply new knowledge and skills to living crops.

Registration is limited to 75 people to ensure small, interactive groups and more hands-on experience. The course begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 3:15 p.m., with check-in starting at 8:30 a.m. Pre-registration must be made before midnight March 26. The registration fee of $100 covers the cost of the course, field guides, course materials, lunch and refreshments. FEEL is located at 1928 240th Street, Boone, Iowa. Additional information, directions and online registration are available at www.aep.iastate.edu/scout.

Apr
1
Mon
April business meeting of the Board of Directors of The Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District
Apr 1 @ 9:00 am

The April business meeting of the Board of Directors of The Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District is scheduled for April 1, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. at the District Headquarters in Holdrege, NE. 

A current agenda is available at the office of the Assistant Secretary at District Headquarters, 415 Lincoln St., Holdrege, NE or online at www.cnppid.com.

Apr
2
Tue
UBB-NRD Water Quality mgt plan open house
Apr 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Landowners and residents of the Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District (NRD) are invited to attend an open house to learn more about the Upper Big Blue NRD’s recent water resource planning efforts that address both water quality and quantity.

This joint planning process, the first of its kind in Nebraska history, began in fall 2018 and will be complete in summer 2018. Partial funding for this project is provided by the NDEQ through a nonpoint source pollution grant.

The open house meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 2, 2019, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Upper Big Blue NRD Office (319 E. 25th Street, York, NE 68467). No formal presentations are planned.

The open house will feature informational displays and handouts detailing the community-guided planning efforts resulting in a draft Water Quality Management Plan and a set of goals and objectives for a to-be-developed Voluntary Integrated Management Plan.

These efforts were in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) and the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources (NeDNR), the respective state partner for each plan. Upper Big Blue NRD staff, representatives from NDEQ and NeDNR, and the consultant team will be available for discussion and questions during the open house. The meeting will also include information and resources about how communities and area residents can help manage the district’s shared resource.

The Water Quality Management Plan is guided by goals and objectives developed by district-wide citizens who are stakeholders for all types of water uses including agriculture and urban users. The plan addresses restoration and water quality protection by identifying several priority areas for initial focus, including two segments of Beaver Creek, Recharge Lake, School Creek, Lake Hastings, two segments of Lincoln Creek, and Oxbow Trail Reservoir. Pollutants of concern include nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen), E. coli bacteria, sediment, herbicides (atrazine), and pesticides. The draft plan will be made available on the NRD website, and the public is encouraged to provide feedback on it by May 15, 2019.

The Voluntary Integrated Management Plan will address the sustainability and quantity of hydrologically connected groundwater and surface water. This plan will be developed after completion of the Water Quality Management Plan is complete. The Voluntary Integrated Water Management Plan’s goals and objectives were also developed by the same district-wide water use stakeholders who volunteered a great amount of their personal time for this joint planning process.

Apr
5
Fri
UNL Agronomy & Horticulture seminars
Apr 5 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

UNL Agronomy and Horticulture seminars

Jan. 25 — Nevin Lawrence, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, integrated weed management specialist, “Integrated Weed Management in the Panhandle of Nebraska.”

Feb. 1 — Sabrina Ruis, postdoctoral research associate in agronomy and horticulture, “Cover Crops and Soil Ecosystem Services in the Great Plains.”

Feb. 8 — Justin McMechan, assistant professor, crop protection and cropping systems specialist, Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, “Cover Crop Management and Insect Interactions.”

Feb. 22 — Leah Sandall, distance education coordinator in agronomy and horticulture; McKinzie Sutter, distance education specialist in agronomy and horticulture; Grace Troupe, online instructor in agronomy and horticulture, “Online Teaching: You Can Do It Too!”

March 1 — Sally Clayshulte, Bayer Crop Science, adjunct associate professor of agronomy and horticulture.

March 8 — Marilyne Stains, associate professor of chemistry, “How is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics taught in North American Universities?”

March 15 — Marty Williams, ecologist in the USDA-ARS, adjunct professor, University of Illinois, “From Transcripts to the Tri-State: Exploiting Plant Density Tolerance to Improve an American Delicacy.”

March 29 — Daran Rudnick, assistant professor of biological systems engineering, irrigation management specialist, West Central Research and Extension Center, “Input Use Efficiency and Farm Profitability as Influenced by Management Practices.”

April 5 — Michael Grusak, center director of the USDA-ARS Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, “Impacting People’s Lives — Strategies to Provide Nutrient-Enriched Staple Food Crops.”

April 12 — Michelle Graham, research geneticist in the USDA-ARS, Iowa State University.

April 19 — Tonya Haigh, project manager rural sociologist of natural resources, National Drought Mitigation Center, “Decision-Making during Drought: What Spurs a Range Manager to Take Action?”

Each talk is in Keim Hall, Room 150, UNL East Campus in Lincoln, and can also be watched online. All seminars are free and open to the public and refreshments will be served at 3 p.m.

Apr
11
Thu
NE Chemigation Certification
Apr 11 all-day

According to Nebraska law, if you plan to chemigate during 2019 and your chemigation certification has expired as of Dec 31, 2018, you will need to attend a training session and pass a written test to become recertified.  The NDEQ records for chemigation licenses are found at: http://go.unl.edu/ndeqchemigate.

Requirements for initial and recertification are the same with no charge for the training, manuals or certification.  One option for individuals needing Initial or Recertification training is to attend one of the Nebraska Extension meeting’s listed on the back page of this letter and pass a written exam.

Another option for those needing Recertification only is to complete an online training program and pass an online test after making an appointment at an exam testing location. The online course will take more time, but if interested, users can find information at: http://go.unl.edu/chemigation.
 
If you plan to become certified, please pre-register at the Nebraska Extension Office whose training session you plan to attend. Phone numbers are listed on the back of this letter for your convenience.  Upon registration you will be asked if you want to receive the training manual and calibration workbook to review prior to the training session. You can also find these materials online at the bottom of this link: http://go.unl.edu/chemigation.

On the day of the training session, please bring your Chemigation Training Manual, Calibration Workbook, No. 2 pencil, and calculator (you are NOT allowed to use your cell phone as a calculator) along to use during the training and testing.  Cell phones are turned off during testing.  If you do not pre-register, as a walk-in you can receive a new copy of the training materials the day of the training.  Review of the material prior to the training session will be very helpful when taking the exam.  Training and testing will take approximately 3 hours.

January 23 – 1:00 p.m. CST – ENREC, Ithaca – Aaron Nygren – 402-352-3821
January 29 – 1:00 p.m. CST – Madison Co. Ext Office, Norfolk – Wayne Ohnesorg – 402-370-4040
February 15 – 1:30 p.m. CST – Holt Co Courthouse Annex, O’Neill – Amy Timmerman – 402-336-2760
February 20 – 6:00 p.m. CST – Club Room, Ag Park, Columbus – Aaron Nygren – 402-352-3821
February 21 – 10:00 a.m. CST – Hartington City Auditorium – Amy Timmerman – 402-336-2760
February 26 – 9:00 a.m. CST – Madison Co Ext Office, Norfolk – Wayne Ohnesorg – 402-370-4040
March 5 – 1:30 p.m. CST – American Legion Hall, Neligh – Wayne Ohnesorg – 402-370-4040
March 11 – 1:00 p.m. CST – Casey’s Building, Fairgrounds, Albion – Aaron Nygren – 402-352-3821
March 12 – 1:30 p.m. CST – Holt Co Courthouse Annex, O’Neill – Amy Timmerman – 402-336-2760
March 14 – 9:00 a.m. CST – Madison Co Ext Office, Norfolk – Wayne Ohnesorg – 402-370-4040
March 14 – 9:30 a.m. CST – Bloomfield Community Center – Amy Timmerman – 402-336-2760
April 11 – 1:30 p.m. CST – Holt Co Courthouse Annex, O’Neill – Amy Timmerman – 402-336-2760

You must attend the entire class and pass the 50 question multiple choice test to be certified.  Upon successful completion of the class, chemigators may renew individual injection site permits administered by the local NRD office before June 1st.  For questions or additional information, don’t hesitate to call the Extension Educator contact listed.

Apr
12
Fri
UNL Agronomy & Horticulture seminars
Apr 12 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

UNL Agronomy and Horticulture seminars

Jan. 25 — Nevin Lawrence, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, integrated weed management specialist, “Integrated Weed Management in the Panhandle of Nebraska.”

Feb. 1 — Sabrina Ruis, postdoctoral research associate in agronomy and horticulture, “Cover Crops and Soil Ecosystem Services in the Great Plains.”

Feb. 8 — Justin McMechan, assistant professor, crop protection and cropping systems specialist, Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, “Cover Crop Management and Insect Interactions.”

Feb. 22 — Leah Sandall, distance education coordinator in agronomy and horticulture; McKinzie Sutter, distance education specialist in agronomy and horticulture; Grace Troupe, online instructor in agronomy and horticulture, “Online Teaching: You Can Do It Too!”

March 1 — Sally Clayshulte, Bayer Crop Science, adjunct associate professor of agronomy and horticulture.

March 8 — Marilyne Stains, associate professor of chemistry, “How is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics taught in North American Universities?”

March 15 — Marty Williams, ecologist in the USDA-ARS, adjunct professor, University of Illinois, “From Transcripts to the Tri-State: Exploiting Plant Density Tolerance to Improve an American Delicacy.”

March 29 — Daran Rudnick, assistant professor of biological systems engineering, irrigation management specialist, West Central Research and Extension Center, “Input Use Efficiency and Farm Profitability as Influenced by Management Practices.”

April 5 — Michael Grusak, center director of the USDA-ARS Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, “Impacting People’s Lives — Strategies to Provide Nutrient-Enriched Staple Food Crops.”

April 12 — Michelle Graham, research geneticist in the USDA-ARS, Iowa State University.

April 19 — Tonya Haigh, project manager rural sociologist of natural resources, National Drought Mitigation Center, “Decision-Making during Drought: What Spurs a Range Manager to Take Action?”

Each talk is in Keim Hall, Room 150, UNL East Campus in Lincoln, and can also be watched online. All seminars are free and open to the public and refreshments will be served at 3 p.m.

Apr
15
Mon
NE Soybean Bd nominations
Apr 15 all-day

This year, the Nebraska Soybean Board (NSB) will be seeking three soybean farmers to serve as a board member to represent fellow soybean farmers and the industry.

What are the 2019 Election districts and counties?
District 2: Counties of Burt, Cuming, Dakota, Dixon, Stanton, Thurston and Wayne
District 4: Counties of Boone, Hamilton, Merrick, Nance, Platte, Polk and York
District 8: Counties of Artur, Banner, Blaine, Box Butte, Brown, Chase, Cherry, Cheyenne, Custer, Dawes, Dawson, Deuel, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Garden, Garfield, Gosper, Grant, Greeley, Harlan, Hayes, Hitchcock, Hooker, Howard, Keith, Keya Paha, Kimball, Lincoln, Logan, Loup, McPherson, Morrill, Perkins, Phelps, Red Willow, Rock, Scottsbluff, Sheridan, Sherman, Sioux, Thomas, Valley and Wheeler

Who can be a candidate for the NSB seat on the board?
You are an eligible candidate if you are a:
• Nebraska resident
• District 2, 4 or 8 resident and a
• Soybean farmer for the past five consecutive years, aged 21 or older, and own or share ownership and risk of loss for such soybeans, by reason of being a partner in a partnership, or is a shareholder in a corporation, or is a member of a limited liability company.

To participate as an eligible candidate, a petition containing 50 valid soybean farmers’ signatures who reside in the election district must be submitted to the NSB office on or before April 15, 2019.

As an elected representative for NSB, you will help guide the Nebraska soybean industry in the areas of research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

The election is conducted by mail-in ballot in July. If you have any questions regarding the election process, please contact NSB Executive Director, Victor Bohuslavsky, at (402) 432-5720. For more information about the Nebraska soybean checkoff, visit www.nebraskasoybeans.org.

Apr
19
Fri
NRCS Cover Crops
Apr 19 all-day

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is leading a state-wide effort to enhance the adoption of soil health management through the Advanced Cover Crop Initiative. Landowners interested in applying for funding to establish cover crops should submit their application at their local NRCS office by April 19.

According to NRCS, the purpose of this initiative is to provide funding to producers to plant cover crops to improve soil health. Participating landowners will be required to plant cover crops for a total of five years on the same acres and share their what they’ve learned.

Producers participating in this initiative will have the option to conduct strip trials of various cover crop management strategies. Producers will receive funding assistance to demonstrate soil health management by planting cover crops. NRCS and involved partners will facilitate using these projects for public field days and the development of case studies showcasing the changes observed.

NRCS’ Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) will be used to fund this initiative. Producers selected will receive this EQIP funding to plant cover crops for 5 years.

For more information on the Advanced Cover Crop Initiative, visit NRCS at the USDA Service Center or www.ne.nrcs.usda.gov.

UNL Agronomy & Horticulture seminars
Apr 19 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

UNL Agronomy and Horticulture seminars

Jan. 25 — Nevin Lawrence, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, integrated weed management specialist, “Integrated Weed Management in the Panhandle of Nebraska.”

Feb. 1 — Sabrina Ruis, postdoctoral research associate in agronomy and horticulture, “Cover Crops and Soil Ecosystem Services in the Great Plains.”

Feb. 8 — Justin McMechan, assistant professor, crop protection and cropping systems specialist, Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, “Cover Crop Management and Insect Interactions.”

Feb. 22 — Leah Sandall, distance education coordinator in agronomy and horticulture; McKinzie Sutter, distance education specialist in agronomy and horticulture; Grace Troupe, online instructor in agronomy and horticulture, “Online Teaching: You Can Do It Too!”

March 1 — Sally Clayshulte, Bayer Crop Science, adjunct associate professor of agronomy and horticulture.

March 8 — Marilyne Stains, associate professor of chemistry, “How is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics taught in North American Universities?”

March 15 — Marty Williams, ecologist in the USDA-ARS, adjunct professor, University of Illinois, “From Transcripts to the Tri-State: Exploiting Plant Density Tolerance to Improve an American Delicacy.”

March 29 — Daran Rudnick, assistant professor of biological systems engineering, irrigation management specialist, West Central Research and Extension Center, “Input Use Efficiency and Farm Profitability as Influenced by Management Practices.”

April 5 — Michael Grusak, center director of the USDA-ARS Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, “Impacting People’s Lives — Strategies to Provide Nutrient-Enriched Staple Food Crops.”

April 12 — Michelle Graham, research geneticist in the USDA-ARS, Iowa State University.

April 19 — Tonya Haigh, project manager rural sociologist of natural resources, National Drought Mitigation Center, “Decision-Making during Drought: What Spurs a Range Manager to Take Action?”

Each talk is in Keim Hall, Room 150, UNL East Campus in Lincoln, and can also be watched online. All seminars are free and open to the public and refreshments will be served at 3 p.m.

May
7
Tue
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 7 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

May
9
Thu
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 9 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

May
14
Tue
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 14 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

May
16
Thu
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 16 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

May
21
Tue
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 21 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

May
23
Thu
Ag Solar Electric webinar series
May 23 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight at homes, farms, and businesses across the Midwest.  Declining cost of PV solar installations makes installing a distributed solar electric system enticing for many farmers. Evaluating the financial investment in solar requires careful consideration of system costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs. Unfortunately, some proposals are hard to understand making it difficult to make fully informed investment decisions.

This six part professional development webinar series will provide you with resources and tools to help consult farmers who are considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions.  Although the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

WEBINAR SCHEDULE – NOTE: Times are Eastern.
Part 1: Estimating System Production – Date: May 7, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 2: Assessing System Cost – Date: May 9, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 3: Forecasting The Value Of Electricity – Date: May 14, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 4: Understanding Incentives – Date: May 16, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 5: Conducting A Financial Analysis – Date: May 21, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)
Part 6: Photovoltaic Solar Example – Date: May 23, 2019 12:30 P.M. -1:30 P.M. (EDT)

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION DETAILS https://osu-cfaes.zoom.us/meeting/register/7710e82d1165e33766858a512be5123a.

CONTACT INFORMATION
F. John Hay:  jhay2@unl.edu
Eric Romich:  romich.2@osu.edu

This Webinar Series is Supported by the North Central Region SARE.

Jun
4
Tue
NE Beef Ambassador contest
Jun 4 all-day

NCW – Consumer Promotion Education Committee with Nebraska Cattlemen would like to announce the 2019 Nebraska Beef Ambassador Contest will be held June 4th at River’s Edge Convention Center in Columbus beginning at 1:00pm. The competition is targeted towards youth that are passionate about the beef industry.

The Nebraska Beef Ambassador Program provides an opportunity for youth, ages 14 – 24 years old, to become spokespersons and future leaders for the beef industry. The two divisions, senior and collegiate, are judged on three different areas of the industry consisting of a mock consumer promotional event, mock media interview and an issues response.

Along with a scholarship from the Nebraska Cattlemen Research and Education Foundation the collegiate winner will have the opportunity to go on and compete at the National level.

They are currently looking for contestants for the 2019 contest. Please share this information and help spread the word about the upcoming Beef Ambassador Contest.

For more information contact Bonita at ncw@necattlemen.org or 402-450-0223 voice/text.

Jun
5
Wed
World Pork Expo
Jun 5 – Jun 7 all-day

Details at www.worldpork.org

Jun
20
Thu
Tractor Safety Training
Jun 20 – Jun 21 all-day

The most common cause of agricultural-related death in Nebraska is overturned tractors and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). Employing anyone uncertified under age 16 is a liability risk for farmers if those children operate such equipment.

Nebraska Extension’s Tractor Safety & Hazardous Occupations Courses take place at 12 Nebraska locations this year for teens 14 or 15 years of age who will work on a farm. Anyone older than 15 is also welcome to attend, but those under age 14 are not eligible to take the class. Extensive training on tractor and ATV safety occurs during in-class lessons with hands-on activities. Instilling an attitude of safety and a respect for agricultural equipment is the primary goal of the course.

The first day of classroom instruction includes hands-on demonstrations, concluding with a written test. Classroom instruction will cover the required elements of the National Safe Tractor and Machinery Operation Program. Students are required to pass the test before taking the driving test on day two. The second day will include a physical driving test with equipment operation and ATV safety lessons. To receive certification, students must demonstrate competence in hitching and unhitching equipment and driving a tractor and trailer through a standardized course. In most locations, instructors will offer an ATV simulator experience to learn about safe behaviors and laws for ATVs and UTVs. Students will also complete homework assignments for the second day.

Instructors for the course include staff members of Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health: Aaron Yoder, PhD, Ellen Duysen, Daniel Kent, and UNMC student Jill Oatman.

All on-site classes begin at 8:00 A.M. and end times will vary, depending on the number of participants. Training site locations, Site Coordinator contact numbers, and dates of training includes:
June 20 & 21 – Fairgrounds, Wayne – (402) 375-3310
July 1 & 2 – Fairgrounds, Weeping Water – (402) 267-2205

Cost of the course is $60, which includes educational materials, instruction, supplies, and lunches.

To register, print and complete a registration form and submit with payment to the appropriate Site Coordinator at least one week before the course (call the specific location number listed above for mailing address and instructions).

Jun
28
Fri
Stockmanship & Stewardship
Jun 28 – Jun 29 all-day

Five sessions of the Stockmanship & Stewardship program will be conducted in 2019 to help bring cattle producers together for further education on proper stockmanship techniques, including local stewardship that is appropriate for their regions.

The two-day California, Iowa, Colorado, Louisiana and Kansas events are made possible through sponsorship from Merck Animal Health and will be coordinated by the producer education team at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and local host organizations. Additional funding and support for the program is provided by the beef checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance program.

Tour dates for the 2019 Stockmanship & Stewardship tour are:
Ames, Iowa June 28-29

Stockmanship & Stewardship events include live cattle demonstration and hands-on opportunities. They also include BQA training and classroom sessions highlighting issues that affect cattle producers in each region. In addition to cattle handling and effective stockmanship, possible elements of regional sessions include sustainability and environmental stewardship, animal health and regional issues and hot topics.

For more information on either the Stockmanship & Stewardship or BQA programs, contact DeCoite at cdecoite@beef.org.